Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)
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Overview & Stats

MIS-C is a rare condition that sometimes occurs in children who have had COVID-19 infection. Symptoms of MIS-C typically develop two or more weeks following infection with COVID-19 and involves inflammation of different parts of the body, such as the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal system. What causes some children to develop MIS-C is not known. MIS-C can be serious or even deadly, but most children recover with medical care.

The New York State Department of Health has investigated and confirmed 533 cases of MIS-C and 3 deaths attributed to MIS-C in New York children (under 21 years old). 

Of the children confirmed as MIS-C cases, 94 percent tested positive for COVID-19 either by diagnostic tests (PCR or antigen), antibody tests or both.

As of 10/15/21, only confirmed MIS-C cases are being reported

 

Age of Cases (as of October 15, 2021)

Age 

Percent of Cases 

<1 

4% 

1-4 

23% 

5-9 

33% 

10-14 

25% 

15-19 

14% 

20-21 

1% 

   

 

 

Race and Ethnicity of Cases (as of October 15, 2021)

Race 

Percent of Cases 

White 

30% 

Black 

30% 

Other  

16% 

Asian 

5% 

Unknown 

19% 

 

Ethnicity 

Percent of Cases 

Not Hispanic 

57% 

Hispanic/Latino 

27% 

Unknown 

16% 

Symptoms

Though most children who get COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms, some children experience severe illness after an apparent recovery from COVID-19 infection. Symptoms of MIS-C may occur two or more weeks after acute COVID-19 illness.

Should your child develop any of the following symptoms following COVID-19 illness, you should seek immediate care for your child from your child’s healthcare provider:

  • Prolonged fever (more than 24 hours)
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Skin Rash
  • Stomach Pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Difficulty feeding (infants) or is too sick to drink fluids

 

Should your child develop any of the following severe symptoms, you should seek emergency medical care when the child has:

  • Change in skin color - becoming pale, patchy and/or blue
  • Trouble breathing or is breathing very quickly
  • Racing heart or chest pain
  • Decreased amount or frequency of urine
  • Confusion, not acting right, or won’t wake up or stay awake

 

Early recognition by pediatricians and referral to a specialist including to critical care are essential.

 

    Information for Healthcare Providers

    Additional information about MIS-C can be found of the CDC website.

    Study in the New England Journal of Medicine: The Department of Health published a study of children with the Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in the New England Journal of Medicine on June 29, 2020.